Joshua Jones

Joshua Jones

ON THE STREET--NOVEMBER

Every few weeks, when we publish an On The Street column, we think, ”Well, that is it. Won’t need to do that for a while.” Yet here we are with a slew of new, exciting F+B concepts in the downtown pipeline.

But first, a moment of silence for the blue cheese and house-made potato chips at Hotel Monaco. Twenty-three years ago you came into our lives and delighted us every time we visited Bambara.  Alas, Chef Patrick LeBeau has reinvigorated the menu with some great fall flavors like scallops ala plancia, quinoa, pomegranate, and mint yogurt. We’ll see you soon Chef!

HOT BUNS! Let’s try to keep this professional, Ok?  Ryan Lowder opens HOT BUNS! on Edison Street–steamed bao buns sold from a walk-up window. Remember Plum Alley–Ryan’s inventive Asian eatery–named one of the top new restaurants by Bon Appétit? We hope that some of our favs from that menu return, certainly the steamy pork bun and illegally rich juicy pork bellies are shoe-in’s… right Ryan? The sign is up, but look for an early spring opening.

Washington State-based Ascend Hospitality knows their way around steak and sushi, so we’ve got our chopsticks and steak knives ready for a VIP reception for Aqua Terra at City Creek Center. They will continue to pay homage to the Pacific Northwest with the freshest fish and aged steaks.

At The Gateway, Chef Marrone’s highly-anticipated Italian Graffitti had a very successful opening on Friday. The space is gorgeous, modern and Chef has publicly stated he wants to be the best Italian restaurant in Utah. Word is they’re already scouting locations in Vegas. 

Lehi-based Wags Cap Foods, owner of 30 restaurants across the country, has HUGE expansion plans for The Gateway’s shuttered Medici space. Electric Fish will be a new sushi/nightclub restaurant, we’re imagining something akin to Vegas’ TAO or Sushisamba. The presser promises a high-end experiential concept unlike anything else in Utah with private poker rooms, card trading, even a candy shop and cryptocurrency ATM. 

With two locations on the west side of the valley, The Break Sports Grill plans to open in the Hyatt House, across from Vivint and the new West Quarter. From chicken tenders to poke bowls, this will be a great place for a group that can’t decide how to please everyone. 

The Local, the food hall on 400 South at 300 East plans to open early January. We’ve been looking forward to this space for over a year and are eagerly anticipating Chef Akhtar Nawab’s culinary collection of offerings over 7,500 sq ft on the ground floor of the Avia.

We like to break ‘scoops’ and fans-of-the-column know our eternal longing for ice cream, so we were surprised when Rockwell Old Fashioned Ice Cream Co. stealthily opened on Regent Street. Now, as a regular, we can direct you to Salted Caramel, S’Mores, and Snicker Doodle as our favs.

The Bagel Project’s Bagel and Greens didn’t last long enough in the US Bank Building on 200 South and Main Street. It's a beautiful, sun-filled space, so we are glad that another local favorite is about to move it. Señor Pollo, a small fast food chain that specializes in Sinoloan-style chicken–imagine, drink in hand, being on a beach in Mexico and the smell of juicy marinated chicken being laid on a charcoal grill… It is coming soon to downtown Salt Lake.

If you’ve made it this far, here is a teaser to whet your thirst… imagine an authentic tiki lounge with interactive animatronic cartoon figurines. The concept, coming downtown, makes our imagination ping pong between Walt Disney and Hunter S. Thompson. More to come!

During the last two and a half years, the metamorphic effect of administrators and white collar workers changing into sweats and pajamas wearers had a devastating impact on downtown restaurants–especially their lunch business. However, as the community of 20,000 commuters begin to flow back downtown, restaurants are boldly betting on the decadent business lunch. 

We’re reminded that it is illegal to not take lunch in France–a languorous 90-minute lunch, in fact! So, whether you’re Ladies who Lunch, or looking for a Two Martini Lunch, here are our favorite downtown places to eat–no, enjoy–lunch with a fork and knife.

The newest restaurant goes first: Franklin Ave on Edison Street has wonderful sandwiches, but we said decadent, so flip the menu page and get the duck ragu or the black cod with miso-soy dashi broth–it might be the best fish we’ve ever eaten, period. 

A year ago, Scott Evans opened the cosmopolitan Pago on Main that gambled on lunch and hit the jackpot.  In the open kitchen, chefs meticulously tweeze the strawberry and beet salad and fire the burners for the flavorful crab cakes–you’ll feel pretty, pretty urban.

It was Ryan Lowder’s announcement that Copper Onion would resume lunch service just last week that was the impetus for this article. We simply cannot get enough of those ricotta dumplings, but the star on the menu–humbly–is the Rainbow Trout. The perfectly pan-seared skin envelops a delicate, flaky fish with a dollop of greek yogurt over curried lentils.  

Ivy & Varley courageously opened during a bleak time for downtown. Luckily, they never hit a road bump–in fact, late at night they get bumpin’. (Did we just age ourselves?) We’re not sure how much longer the patio will be open for lunch, but it is a delightful space to spend a Friday afternoon over a bowl of cheesy grits and shrimp–and maybe two martinis. 

Have an expense account? Bring clients along and feel like Caesar at Spencer’s inside the Hilton or The Capital Grill at City Creek Center. The dark wood, the cushy seats, the bespoke service, the Wagyu beef. Secrets spill easily in haunts like these. 

Consistently rated one of the best restaurants in Salt Lake–maybe Utah–is Takashi. Yes, Takashi is open for lunch, and we selfishly fear broadcasting this since getting a table at night means quite a wait. Don’t judge us for eyeing the Tanka, basically a spicy California roll, or devouring the grilled chicken with teriyaki sauce… you won’t find them made better anywhere else.

And, when talking about fine dining downtown, in-particular, an over-the-top lunch, let’s not forget The Oyster Bar. Step into a sophisticated seaside clubhouse 700 miles from the ocean and snack on Seafood Louie before tucking into the famous clam chowder served with hot sourdough. 

We just realized there is a lot of seafood on this list–way to go Salt Lake! One more: Current Fish and Oyster. We love this light-filled room at lunch, and if a $30 seafood cobb doesn’t say decadent, what does? Maybe the Fish Stew? With prawns, mussels, Thai basil peanuts, and bonito flakes in a serrano pistou coconut lemongrass broth… Oomph.

Let me remind everyone that our opinions are our own. Admittedly, this isn’t a comprehensive list, but the clock is getting close to noon, so feel free to add your favorites. We’re going to seize the day with a lunch filled with joie de vivre.

“Our city has lost a friend. For more than twenty years, Valter Nassi has been a pillar of Downtown Salt Lake City and helped create the culinary scene that exists today. When visiting Valter’s Osteria, guests are transported to another world, a place where you feel loved and cared for, a place that feels like home," said Derek Miller, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance.

“People from all over the globe know Utah because they know Valter. They know his name, his exuberance, and his love of life. These qualities are greatly needed at this time. His legacy will be remembered for years to come, and his life serves as a model for all to follow.”

In 2018, Nassi was awarded the New American Dream Award by the Salt Lake Chamber, which honored “new pioneers” and the positive impact of immigrants and how they have helped shape Utah’s history since the Mormon Pioneers entered the Salt Lake Valley as refugees in 1847. 

In 2013, Nassi was recognized with a Downtown Achievement Award by the Downtown Alliance for his role in elevating the culinary scene and helping to create a more dynamic and diverse community that is the regional center for culture, commerce and entertainment.

Valter Nassi died Tuesday, September 20, 2022.

Banner Design & Production Companies

Alpha Graphics
www.alphagraphics.com
117 West 900 South
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
801-364-8451

Presto Print
www.prestoprint.espwebsite.com
3855 South 500 West, Unit J
South Salt Lake, Utah 84115
801-355-6131

Renaissance Signs
www.renaissance-signs.com
423 West 800 South, Suite A111
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
801-518-9763

SLC Print
www.slcprint.com
725 South 300 West
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
801-755-5759

Vision Graphics
www.visiondoesit.com
2525 South 900 West
Salt Lake City, Utah 84119
801-973-8929

Zion Printing
www.zionprinting.com
450 South 300 W
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
801-532-3070

Zip Graphic
www.zipgraphic.com
515 West Pickett Circle, Suite 200
Salt Lake City, Utah 84115
801-887-8000

Downtown Salt Lake CityBanner Advertising Policies and Guidelines

Downtown Alliance is dedicated to building a dynamic and diverse community that is the regional center for culture, commerce and entertainment. Downtown Alliance manages the rental, installation, and content of the banners displayed on the light poles along the streets of the Salt Lake City Central Business Improvement District.

Eligible Participants

Local non-profit organizations, city and county governments or the State of Utah will have priorities and first picks. Organizations, subject matter and banner content must be approved by Downtown Alliance at least 60 days before the anticipated promotional schedule. Exceptions may be made to the policy concerning eligible participants and subject matter by Downtown Alliance for events and activities of major civic importance.

Available Space

Banner posts located on both sides of West Temple from South Temple to 200 South and State Street from South Temple to 400 South are designated for eight foot banners. All other banner poles in the central business district hold six foot banners. The maximum number of locations is limited by the space available. Space can be reserved up to one year in advance.

Cost

The cost to install, remove and maintain the banners is $25.00 per banner per month with a minimum of one month rental. Early removal fee is $10.00 per banner if run time is less than a full month.

Cost of designing, producing, and repairing the banners is the responsibility of the event/organization.

Payment

Payment is due upon approval of reservation. Any date extensions made following initial reservation will be invoiced separately. 

Pick-up/Delivery

Participants are asked to have banners printed and ready for pickup at least one week before the display schedule. 

A fee of $150 for up to 100 banners will be invoiced for pick-up and delivery within the Salt Lake Valley. Anything beyond 100 banners will be an additional fee. Pick-up/delivery outside the Salt Lake Valley will not be picked up by Eric Crowther and be the responsibility of the organization/participant. 

In consideration of other reservations, we will not guarantee that banners will be hung on time if they are not printed and ready for pick-up on time. Contact Eric Crowther at 801-349-0660 for scheduling.

Storage Fee

Storage arrangements can be made on a case by case basis. If storage is needed, a rental fee of $5 per banner/per month will be invoiced.  

Sponsorship/Underwriter Acknowledgements & Standards

Promotional banners may carry a sponsor’s logo and positioning statement. The sponsor logo and positioning statement is limited to the bottom 20 percent of the banner. Sponsor information that exceeds 6 inches across the bottom of the banner will be refused.

Banner Standards

Materials for banners include vinyl, photo/mechanical/digital printing, or screen-print. Banners must be constructed of a material that can withstand the forces of nature for the period of time they are to be displayed. Torn or damaged banners will not be hung. Downtown Alliance strongly encourages scalloped banners to withstand strong winds or to prevent loss or damage. 

Banners on State Street and West Temple are to have an overall length of 96 inches and width of 22.5 inches. There is to be a 3 inch sleeve at the top of the banner to slide over the bracket. The bottom is to have a 1.5 inch hem while the sides are to have a minimum hem of .5 inches. The graphic area is not to exceed 21 inches by 87.5 inches. There must be three grommets on the inside hem of each banner for proper attachment to the poles, they should be ½” away from the edge of the banner; for placement refer to the Downtown Alliance website for banner specifications. The inside diameter of the grommets should be 3/8” (#2) or 7/16” (#3).

Banners for placement in all other locations are to have an overall length of 72 inches and width of 22.5 inches. There is to be a 3 inch sleeve at the top of the banner to slide over the bracket. The bottom is to have a 1.5 inch hem while the sides are to have a minimum hem of .5 inches. The graphic area is not to exceed 21 inches by 66 inches. There must be three grommets on the inside hem of each banner for proper attachment to the poles; for placement refer to the Downtown Alliance website. The inside diameter of the grommets should be 3/8” (#2) or 7/16” (#3).

A list of banner production companies is available upon request. Downtown Alliance does not endorse any particular service provider.

Maintenance and Liability

Downtown Alliance or its subcontractors are not responsible for damage to the banners while they are being installed, displayed or retrieved, and stored. Damaged or dirty banners will not be displayed. The cleaning of banners is the responsibility of the leasing organization. The installation contractor will repair banners if needed while they are installed. All costs for banner repairs are the responsibility of the lessee. The installation contractor will hold banners for pick-up for one week following the final date of the display contract. After that time a storage charge of $5.00 per banner per month will be imposed. Nonpayment for the storage fee will result in disposal of the banners.

Downtown Salt Lake CityBanner Advertising Policies and Guidelines

Downtown Alliance is dedicated to building a dynamic and diverse community that is the regional center for culture, commerce and entertainment. Downtown Alliance manages the rental, installation, and content of the banners displayed on the light poles along the streets of the Salt Lake City Central Business Improvement District.

Eligible Participants

Local non-profit organizations, city and county governments or the State of Utah will have priorities and first picks. Organizations, subject matter and banner content must be approved by Downtown Alliance at least 60 days before the anticipated promotional schedule. Exceptions may be made to the policy concerning eligible participants and subject matter by Downtown Alliance for events and activities of major civic importance.

Available Space

Banner posts located on both sides of West Temple from South Temple to 200 South and State Street from South Temple to 400 South are designated for eight foot banners. All other banner poles in the central business district hold six foot banners. The maximum number of locations is limited by the space available. Space can be reserved up to one year in advance.

Cost

The cost to install, remove and maintain the banners is $25.00 per banner per month with a minimum of one month rental. Early removal fee is $10.00 per banner if run time is less than a full month.

Cost of designing, producing, and repairing the banners is the responsibility of the event/organization.

Payment

Payment is due upon approval of reservation. Any date extensions made following initial reservation will be invoiced separately. 

Pick-up/Delivery

Participants are asked to have banners printed and ready for pickup at least one week before the display schedule. 

A fee of $150 for up to 100 banners will be invoiced for pick-up and delivery within the Salt Lake Valley. Anything beyond 100 banners will be an additional fee. Pick-up/delivery outside the Salt Lake Valley will not be picked up by Eric Crowther and be the responsibility of the organization/participant. 

In consideration of other reservations, we will not guarantee that banners will be hung on time if they are not printed and ready for pick-up on time. Contact Eric Crowther at 801-349-0660 for scheduling.

Storage Fee

Storage arrangements can be made on a case by case basis. If storage is needed, a rental fee of $5 per banner/per month will be invoiced.  

Sponsorship/Underwriter Acknowledgements & Standards

Promotional banners may carry a sponsor’s logo and positioning statement. The sponsor logo and positioning statement is limited to the bottom 20 percent of the banner. Sponsor information that exceeds 6 inches across the bottom of the banner will be refused.

Banner Standards

Materials for banners include vinyl, photo/mechanical/digital printing, or screen-print. Banners must be constructed of a material that can withstand the forces of nature for the period of time they are to be displayed. Torn or damaged banners will not be hung. Downtown Alliance strongly encourages scalloped banners to withstand strong winds or to prevent loss or damage. 

Banners on State Street and West Temple are to have an overall length of 96 inches and width of 22.5 inches. There is to be a 3 inch sleeve at the top of the banner to slide over the bracket. The bottom is to have a 1.5 inch hem while the sides are to have a minimum hem of .5 inches. The graphic area is not to exceed 21 inches by 87.5 inches. There must be three grommets on the inside hem of each banner for proper attachment to the poles, they should be ½” away from the edge of the banner; for placement refer to the Downtown Alliance website for banner specifications. The inside diameter of the grommets should be 3/8” (#2) or 7/16” (#3).

Banners for placement in all other locations are to have an overall length of 72 inches and width of 22.5 inches. There is to be a 3 inch sleeve at the top of the banner to slide over the bracket. The bottom is to have a 1.5 inch hem while the sides are to have a minimum hem of .5 inches. The graphic area is not to exceed 21 inches by 66 inches. There must be three grommets on the inside hem of each banner for proper attachment to the poles; for placement refer to the Downtown Alliance website. The inside diameter of the grommets should be 3/8” (#2) or 7/16” (#3).

A list of banner production companies is available upon request. Downtown Alliance does not endorse any particular service provider.

Maintenance and Liability

Downtown Alliance or its subcontractors are not responsible for damage to the banners while they are being installed, displayed or retrieved, and stored. Damaged or dirty banners will not be displayed. The cleaning of banners is the responsibility of the leasing organization. The installation contractor will repair banners if needed while they are installed. All costs for banner repairs are the responsibility of the lessee. The installation contractor will hold banners for pick-up for one week following the final date of the display contract. After that time a storage charge of $5.00 per banner per month will be imposed. Nonpayment for the storage fee will result in disposal of the banners.

Let’s crack some eggs and break some news: Curry Up Now and Mortar and Pestle are no more. The national chain that took over Cedars of Lebanon and served Indian fast casual populated the space for just two years. We’ll miss their tikka masala but are VERY excited to have locally-owned Laziz spread its wings into downtown. Kafta Burgers all around! The plan is to open in mid-September… and look for that adorable tiny bar in the back to be updated and renamed Back Door. Hey, don’t overthink it!

Across the street, a new owner is remodeling what was Cancun Cafe and is planning a Mexican restaurant featuring pescados y mariscos. Mexican del mar is a category missing in downtown, so bring on the ceviche, we’re ready!

Further down 200 comes a very intriguing new restaurant from the Bon Patt Group (owners of Chrisopher’s Prime, Fat Jack’s, and Toro Rasa). Homecoming Southern Kitchen & Bar will occupy the old Olive Garden–a very desirable space kitty corner to Hyatt Regency, which will open next month. A neon sign is up and a menu isonline, but judging by the steel framing, they have several months to go before we get to taste a Pulled Pork Melt, slicing into Prime Rib, or sample the Fried Fish Plate with hushpuppies. Oh Momma! 

We love this next story a latte. Grinding it out in the grounds of the Axis Building, Cupla Coffee is moving east of the aforementioned Homecoming! We’ve bean going for a Cupla years, espresso-ly for the lox, egg and cheese croissant, and of course those signature drinks. 

Speaking of Hyatt Regency, the new convention hotel is a gorgeous addition to the skyline. We love the renderings for the soaring, modern Lobby Bar, but even more alluring is the Catalan-influenced restaurant, Mar | Muntanya (sea and mountain). Located on the 6th floor with an outdoor terrace, it is helmed by Chef Tyson Peterson, formerly at the acclaimed Jean-Georges Vongerichten restaurant inside St. Regis, Deer Valley.  He recently told us to expect the menu to feature elk tenderloin, suckling pig, and the highest quality oysters. To wash it down and truly imbibe the Spanish flavors, Chef is working on a stupendous selection of sangrias as well as a gin-heavy craft cocktail menu (apparently Spaniards love gin, who knew?)

Finally, this writer recently moved into the Westgate Lofts on 200 South and what would you know? Maxwell’s Little Bar (21+) has opened directly below us, next to Vosen’s German Bakery. (We’re doomed). The adorable postage stamp space fits 30 people and offers all those beloved recipes you loved at the Main Street location. They even have a walk-up for slices! See you there soon. 

In-store shopping is coming back in a big way and it is driving entrepreneurs to find physical locations across downtown to expand, or open new businesses. 

In brick-and-mortar brands, the biggest success across the nation is fitness channels. City Creek welcomed two such businesses recently: Vuori, a premium performance apparel brand inspired by a coastal California lifestyle; and Asher, a high-quality golf apparel retailer. Also, newly-opened at City Creek is Lovisa, a fashion forward jewelry brand with ready-to-wear affordable rings, necklaces, earrings, and more.

Luxury was one of the strongest segments during the peak of the pandemic. With less entertainment spending, there was a significant increase in other disposable income. With that comes Jade Furnishings at The Gateway. What started as two friends doing residential interior design has grown into a company that has been featured on HGTV and in Sunset Magazine. Soon they will sell their highly-curated furniture from around the world to the public. They are located near the Olympic Plaza. Also opened at The Gateway, inside the Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum, is The Red Balloon Toy Store. We’re big fans of this Utah-based company and congratulate them on their eighth store!

Finally, sprouting on Broadway is From the Ground Up, a rock and coffee shop from local entrepreneur Kathie Chadbourne. This gem is filled with treasures including Native American art, jewelry, and unique gifts. A trickling water feature welcomes you and Kathie fills the space with a positive aura. Go find some treasures!

rock_shop.png

 

After a two-year hiatus, Pie and Beer Day comes to The Gateway combined with the new Locally Made Locally Played Music Festival. Presented by The Blocks and Bad Brad Wheeler, the official sudsy celebration for alt-Utah and all things pie, beer, and music will be July 24, 12-6pm, offering more than 9,000 slices of pie and beer from 24 local breweries. 

“Sometimes, new residents of Utah can feel left out from the observances on July 24. Our celebration is inclusive and welcoming to all,” said Brad Wheeler. “I invite everyone to this wholesome, family-friendly event with the world's largest assemblage of pie and beer!” As in past years, proceeds benefit KUAA 99.9FM, a nonprofit community radio station that supports local musicians. 

Lucas Goodrich, Director of The Blocks adds, “Pie and Beer Day is a perfect opportunity to elevate Locally Made Locally Played, an initiative born out of the pandemic as a way to keep musicians employed by performing on KUAA 99.9 FM. With our return to normalcy, I’m excited to continue our efforts and bring musicians out of the studio and onto the streets.” 

Confirmed acts to perform on the north stage of The Gateway include Proper Way, Timmy The Teeth, Cowjazz, and more to be announced. 

“As a growing entertainment district continually evolving with innovative, new bars and restaurants, The Gateway and our merchants are excited to host the Pie and Beer Day celebration,” said Jacklyn Briggs, Marketing Director of The Gateway. “It’s a fun, counterculture alternative to the traditional state holiday and a unique opportunity to provide exposure to local food vendors and craft beer.”

Breweries include: Bewildered, Level Crossing, Brohemian, Salt Flats, Strap Tank, Uinta, Proper, RoHa, Epic, Red Rock, Roosters, Squatters, Wasatch, Desert Edge, Moab, Offset, Shades, Hopkins, Fisher, Salt Fire, Utog, TF Brewing, Ogden River, MTN West.

Pies are being donated from Porcupine Grill, Avenue Proper, Stein Erickson Lodge, UTOG, Oquirrh, The Dodo, Copper Onion, Eva’s Bakery, Eggs in the City, NOMAD, Flanker Kitchen + Sporting Club, Pies The Limit, Goodfood Gluten Free Bakery, Rocky Mountain Pies, Tin Angel, Brewers Bread, Este Pizzeria, Emigration Cafe, Flake Pie Co., Squatters, Wasatch Brew Pub, Bakery 43, and Bricks Corner Pizza. 

   

The Locally Made Locally Played Music Festival is free to all ages. Pie Passes, sold at the door, will include five beer and pie pairings for $40. 

Join us to celebrate downtown and the creators who are making it vibrant, prosperous, and lovable! 

THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2022
9:00am - 11:00am
95 STATE at CITY CREEK CENTER, FLOOR 23


Capture.PNG

 

2022 STATE OF DOWNTOWN AGENDA

Peter Kageyama

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Peter Kageyama, Author
For The Love of Cities

Peter Kageyama is the author of For the Love of Cities: The Love Affair Between People and Their Places. He is a Senior Fellow with the Alliance for Innovation, a national network of city leaders that is dedicated to improving the practice of local government. Since speaking to them in 2013, Peter has become a special advisor to America In Bloom. He is an internationally sought-after community development consultant and grassroots engagement strategist who speaks all over the world about bottom-up community development and the amazing people who are making change happen.

3.jpg

 

 

 4.jpg 

ALUMNI OF THE CREATOR AWARD

Martine Cafe, Robin Hutcheson, Babs De Lay, Broadway Media Group, Senate Majority Whip Stuart Adams, Representative Brad Wilson, Deputy Chief Mike Brown, Tom Guinney, The Depot, Mayor Ben McAdams, Valter Nassi, Neumont University, Salt Lake City Greek Festival, SelectHealth, The Downtown Merchants Association, City Creek Center, Gallivan Plaza /RDA, The Twilight Concert Series, Dick Wirick, Scott Beck, Royal Eatery, Chief Chris Burbank, OC Tanner, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Mayor Ralph Becker, the Utah Jazz, Broadway Merchants, Zions Securities Corporation, Bill Knowles, XMission, Walker Center, Utah Transit Authority, Salt Lake City Weekly, Zim's Crafts, Robert Farrington, Downtown Rising, Squatters, Bennion Jewelers, Mr. Mac, Fidelity Investments, The Summit Group, Discovery Gateway, LDS Business College, The Eccles Foundation, Utah Heritage Foundation, Wasatch Property Management, Big D Construction, Zions Bank, Cowboy Partners, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Steven and Cleves Weber, Salt Lake City Council, Bishop H. David Burton, KUTV 2News, Meier and Frank, The Outdoor Industry Association, VNU Expositions, Salt Lake City Library, Clark Planetarium, Downtown Dine O' Round, Mayor Rocky Anderson, The Gateway, Salt Lake City International Jazz Festival, Jess Agraz, Transportation Management Assoc., Tim Harpst, Salt Lake City Parking & Transportation, 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Davis County Transportation Tax Initiative, Rick Davis, The Wells Fargo Center, The Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, Salt Lake Art Center, Broadway Lofts, Zephyr Club, Utah Opera Company, TRAX-Utah Transit Authority, Hotel Monaco, Jon Schumann, Sr., FFKR Architects, Gastronomy, Inc., Repertory Dance Theatre, Ririe Woodbury, Gallivan Plaza, KSL Television, Hansen Planetarium, Salt Lake Convention & Visitors Bureau, Naylor Wentworth Architects, Bill Martin, J. Michael Martin, Cordant Technologies, Edwards & Daniels Architects, Living Traditions Festival, David Winder/Lou Watson, Greek Festival, Tony Caputo's Market, Sam Weller, Gina Bachauer International Piano Foundation, Temple Square Concert Series, Utah Arts Festival, Downtown Farmers Market, Simmons Radio Group, Salt Palace Convention Center, Brownstone Building, The Metropolitan, I. J. Wagner, Overland Development, Art Access, City Creek Park and Brigham Historic Park, Salt Lake Chamber, KTVX, American Stores Company, Henderson Building, Artspace, California Tire & Rubber Co., Stephen Goldsmith, Fred Ball, Salt Lake County, American Investment Bank, First Night, KRCL, Rio Grande Neighborhood Council, George Hofman, Harris Simmons, Hal Clyde, Neal Stowe, Salt Lake Gallery Association, Exchange Place Partnership, Zivio Ethnic Arts Ensemble, KSL TV/Radio, Salt Lake Redevelopment Agency, Non-Profit Housing Corp., Peter Lassic, John Williams, Eddie Bauer, The Gap, Salt Lake City Arts Council, Deseret News, Verl Topham, Larry H. Miller, SLCPD Bike Squad, 111 Main/City Creek Reserve, Gail Miller & Miller Family, Salt Lake Tribune, Vestar Corporation, Cultural Core & Vasilios Priskos.

Page 1 of 3